Parity Update

Parity update now live!

The parity update for All Ways Down brings both the WebGL and the standalone version up to date with the recently released Android version of All Ways Down (available now on the Google Play store).

New features include:
  • New collectables system:
    Each level now contains a golden collectable.
  • New level rating system:
    Each level now has a rating system, where a level completion is rated based on whether the level is complete, if the player died or if the golden collectable was picked up.
  • Further improved UI, including new UI animations.
  • And finally the ability to alter some graphical settings, such as overall quality and Vsync.

Other changes include general performance tweaks, bug fixes, new save system, level tweaks, and the combining of continuous play(Story mode) and single level play.

The parity update is now live on Itch.io, Gamejolt, newGrounds, and Kongregate.

Available Now on:


All Ways Down Now On Google Play Store!!!

Yes, the day has finally arrived! All Ways Down has finally landed on the Google play store.

Featuring:

  • New collectables,
  • Further improved and reworked menu UI,
  • UI animations,
  • Nvidia Shield Controller support,
  • Improved performance,
  • General improvements,

All Ways Down is available now on the Google Play store!

Get it on Google Play

Google Play and the Google Play logo are trademarks of Google Inc.

All Ways Down + General news

It’s been a busy past couple of weeks so I figured I would post a bit of an update on progress and upcoming plans.

Just before Christmas I uploaded All Ways Down to newGrounds and shortly after to Kongregate, with some reasonable success, managing to hit the front page of newGrounds just a few days after uploading :-).  I received some great feedback from the users of these sites, which has allowed me to improve the gameplay, iron out some bugs and give it some more polish overall(I’ll include the full list of changes at the end of this post).

Because I’ve been working on these further updates I decided to temporarily put the android build on hold, and focus on improving the version that was available. But, do not fear, I am still planning on releasing All Ways Down on Android. However, I want to make sure it is ready and tested before I do so, which may take a little longer. Though I do currently have a stable finished build running on both a mobile and tablet so it shouldn’t be too long, it just depend on whether or not I add a feature I’ve been thinking about…

Now All Ways Down is almost finished, (again), I’m starting to think about my next project. I have a couple ideas in mind which you might hear more about once I’ve fleshed them out a bit. I also have a couple ideas for this site but we’ll have to wait and see.

Anyhow, I’m off to go have some fun in Unity,

Joe.

All Ways Down Change-log:
  • Increased pickup size.
  • Increased goal detection area.
  • Increased level rotation speed.
  • Improved various UI elements.
  • Added current level number to pause and level complete screens.
  • Added trail effect.
  • Tweaked overall game difficulty.
  • Added mute button.
  • Added mouse input for level rotation.
  • Tweaks to early levels to adjust game’s difficulty curve.
  • Added restart button.

All Ways Down Anniversary Update

It’s been almost a year since the inception of All Ways Down during Ludum Dare 34, and to mark this occasion I would like to announce the release of the All Ways Down Anniversary update.

The update includes:

      • New Levels.
      • New Obstacles,
      • New Menu UI,
      • Level Selection,
      • End of game stats,
      • Improved performance,
      • Touch support,
      • And many more improvements and bug-fixes.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The update is now live on its itch.io page and here on noddingTortoise. Further the game is also now available on GameJolt. So there really isn’t a reason not to check it out 😀

GameJolt page.

Last but not least, I’m currently working on the Android version of All Ways Down that I’ll hopefully have finished before Christmas.

Joe.

Decided to enter LudumDare 35

So I decided to enter Ludum Dare again, the result of which can be found here, over on the Ludum Dare site. I’ll probably write a post mortem sometime during the next week. However, in the meantime you can watch a gameplay video I put together of my entry ‘Court of Talis’ below or you can check it out via one of the links at the end of this post 😀

Links:
Game page
LudumDare entry page: http://ludumdare.com/compo/ludum-dare-35/?action=preview&uid=63291

Itch.io Page:

Joe.

New Project Announcement

It’s been awhile since my last project Mamore, almost two and a half months in fact, but during this time I haven’t just been playing through my Steam back catalogue whilst refreshing the Fallout 4 countdown timer(even though I may have a couple of times), instead I’ve been busy working on my next project. In fact you may have already seen some of the early screenshots and concept art for the game that I’ve been posting over the last month. Now today, I’m happy to officially announce my new project TaO-VARG.

TaOvargTitle

TaO-VARG is a challenging action puzzle game where your goal as the player is to guide a Ballistic Acceleration ellipse(BALL for short) to the goal by using two special gravity particles: Thrusts and Orbits. Further, in order to successfully complete a level, not only must the BALL reach the goal, but it must do so within certain limits, these limits are imposed on the number of respective particles that can be used each level, with three pass marks(bronze, silver and gold) associated with how few(or many) the player uses. If the player reaches the goal but uses too many of a particular particle then they must try again.

The different pass requirements for a level.
The different pass requirements for a level.

In total there are currently 40 levels to beat, with the later levels becoming more and more challenging for the player(though some of the early levels can be a challenge as well). The levels start simple, but as the player progresses through the game they  will encounter a variety of obstacles, ranging from turrets to lasers.

An early TaOVARG level
An early TaOVARG level

The game is currently still in alpha, though it is finished for the most part(I’ll list the things I want to possibly add to the game at the end of this post, along with download links). But the game does need some fine tweaking. This is where I’d like you, the reader, to come in. Unfortunately I’m a bit too familiar with the game(having made it and all), so it’s hard to tell if some levels are a bit too hard. Therefore, I need some more widespread playtesting and feedback on the levels, so that I can put the finishing touches on the game. Basically, I’d like you to just play the game; if you finish it that would be awesome but its not a requirement, and hopefully whether you finish or not you have some fun doing so. And if you want to give me some feedback on the experience that would be awesome too, all constructive criticisms are welcomed.

Below you will find a link to a windows installer along with a standard Unity standalone package.

Windows Installer

Standalone Package

Things I’d like to add or do in no particular order:

-In game tutorial;

-Add more particle effects – for thrust particle, orbit and collisions with walls;

-Alternative control schemes, along with controller support;

-In game options menu, for controls, sound and resolution;

-More sound effects;

-Better end screen;

-Better aspect ratio support;

-Mobile version (This will likely come after all the others);

So that’s that, I had a blast making TaO-VARG, and I am looking forward to making it that little bit better with all your help 🙂

Joe.

New Game: My Indie Game Maker Submission – Mamore

MamoreScreen1

A few weeks back, around the time I was finishing off Balloon pop, I was visiting HumbleBundle, if you haven’t heard of this site you should seriously check it out, games + charity = Awesome,  to check out their new main bundle, what I found was a bundle dedicated to making games, specifically, a bundle supporting the Indie Games Maker Contest 2015 (IGMC2015).

I wanted to find out more about this contest, and as I didn’t know much about IGMC I decided to investigate further. I headed over to the site and had a quick look through the rules and guidelines. At the time I thought it would be interesting to enter, but felt that I wanted to concentrate on finishing my then current project.

After I finally wrapped up balloon Pop,  I started thinking about my next project and what I wanted to do both in scale and type. I wanted my next project to be another simple-ish project but to be slightly larger in scale, a tad more ambitious.

It was then that I remembered the competition and thought it might be an idea to make a game that follows the rules and guidelines, that way if I finish it before the cutoff date, and I think it is good enough, I could enter it into the competition. And so I decided to investigate the competition a bit more. I headed back over to the site and reread the rules and guidelines, making note of the twist growth. At this point the competition had already been running for almost a week, leaving me about three weeks to make a game, which aligned nicely with the amount of time I wanted to dedicate to my next project.

Idea:

After rereading the rules and guidelines, I started brainstorming ideas for projects that were somewhat simple and incorporated growth. I played around with a couple ideas, including a platformer where you must grow a central beanstalk to reach higher levels, but I felt this would take longer than 3 weeks to make. I wanted something simple both graphically and mechanically but still had some depth, whilst also adhering to the theme of growth. Eventually  I settled on an idea where the aim of the game was to protect a central block from a growing number of incoming blocks, and where these incoming blocks could also grow in size. I created a few concepts, settling on a style I liked before starting work on the prototype.

MamoreConcept
Early Concept

Development:

For most of the development from prototype to finished game not much really changed in terms of core gameplay and graphical style. Not to say things didn’t change, in fact as a game starts to flesh out you find somethings just don’t work or could be done differently. For example, initially there was going to be a health bar at the top of the screen to represent the health of the block the player must defend. But early in development I decided I didn’t want the top of the screen obscured, so I came up with the idea to use the block itself to take on the role of the health bar, changing colour as it loses, or gains, energy; along with the introduction of a two stage size increase as the energy drops/rises; I also felt this was a nice nod to growth. But for the most part the core remained the same.

BlockItScreen2
Centre block changed from single size and colour to increasing in size and changing colour.

The majority of development time was probably spent on the enemy blocks, as not only do they add variety to the game, but also because I wanted each block to be slightly different. With different characteristics such as speed or its behavior once it got close to the target.

The last thing to really get added, other than last minute particle effects, was the inclusion of turrets and block traps. These were in fact in the initial design outline, but I felt I should leave them until last in case I didn’t have enough time to implement them properly, as the game was still fully playable without them. Thankfully this wasn’t the case however, and I feel they add a nice element of strategy and resource management to the overall feel of the game.

MamoreScreen6
Final game, Particle effects were added to the lifeblock(centre block) and when the player destroys an enemy. Turrets and block traps were also added.

Final Thoughts

I realise the game is far from perfect, with plenty of areas for improvements, such as difficulty balance and different game types etc, but I feel that it’s a good improvement, even an increment on my last project, and was completed in roughly the same amount of time.
Overall I’m pleased with how the game turned out and glad that I stuck to the time window so that I could enter the competition, and most of all I had a lot of fun making it.

You can check out my IGMC2015 submission over at http://contest.gamedevfort.com/submission/433

Wish me luck

Joe.